PREFACE

The School of Music Student Handbook is written as a guide for students majoring in the study of music at Nyack College.  Each year the school makes continued efforts to enhance the program of study.  The School of Music Student Handbook is updated each summer, and copies are made available to all music majors at the beginning of the fall semester.

The contents of this handbook, along with the Nyack College Catalog, are to be studied and referred to concerning questions relating to the music program. Students are responsible for the contents of this document and will be expected to meet the various curricular requirements.

 

The School of Music offers five music curricula at the baccalaureate level:

 

o        Bachelor of Music in Performance

o        Bachelor of Music in Music Education

o        Bachelor of Sacred Music

o        Bachelor of Music in Composition

o        Bachelor of Arts in Music

 

 

MISSION STATEMENTS

NYACK COLLEGE MISSION STATEMENT

Nyack College, a Christian liberal arts college of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, seeks to assist students in their spiritual, intellectual, and social formation, preparing them for lives of service to Christ, to His church, and to society, in a way that reflects the Kingdom of God in its ethnic diversity.

SCHOOL OF MUSIC MISSION STATEMENT

The School of Music, in its various degree programs, is committed to excellence in personal, musical, and spiritual development, in an atmosphere, which fosters creativity, dedication, energy, and vision.

 

MISSION, GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Primarily the mission and the academic goals of Nyack College determine the School of Music mission, goals and objectives.  They are further shaped by the following factors:

q       The desire and mandate to serve the Christian and Missionary Alliance denomination.

q       The distinction of the Christian liberal arts college.

q       The Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) standards for accreditation.

q       The college’s location in the New York metropolitan area with its cultural resources and professional music schools.

 

 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

 

GOAL 1:   To graduate students who have acquired and developed the foundational academic skills of reading carefully and critically, communicating clearly and cogently, and thinking analytically and synthetically

· by designing into music courses a cognitive approach to the language and syntax of harmony, form, and the structure of music.

· by designing into the music history sequence a comprehensive overview of Western music and related religious, philosophical, political, scientific, and social developments.

· by designing into music literature courses the appreciation and understanding of non-Western music and music of the church, including research components and the analysis of contemporary phenomena in these areas.

· by fostering the aural development, kinesthetic processes, and aesthetic sensitivities which form the basis of professional caliber musicianship.

 

GOAL 2:    To graduate students who have achieved a broad understanding of  human learning.             

· by fostering in our students the skills and motivation for life-long learning and participation in music.

· by encouraging all students to value the creativity of the human spirit and the aesthetic dimension of life.

· by promoting involvement in campus life through participation in aesthetic and cultural activities.

 

GOAL 3:  To graduate students who have achieved an in-depth understanding of one particular field of study by meeting the requirements of at least one major

· by training our students to acquire the theoretical and practical skills required by music educators, church musicians, performers and composers.

· by fostering a broad knowledge of music literature, both sacred and secular, through study and performance.

· by employing a competency-based approach for course design and requirements throughout the program while encouraging artistic creativity.

· by cultivating career programs and awareness in the various music and music-related fields.

· by utilizing the cultural resources of various metropolitan New York area institutions.

GOAL 4:  To graduate students who have achieved a basic Christian worldview understanding which can serve as a basis for interpreting experience

· by providing experiences in Christian ministry involving music in the Christian and Missionary Alliance and other churches.

· by promoting a sense of Christian love and caring throughout the endeavors of the School of Music.

· by building the self-esteem of the individual through musical achievement in the Christian context.

· by fostering a respect for diverse forms of music, worship, and culture.

 

GOAL 5: To strengthen a sense of civic responsibility to the community

· by promoting in our students an appreciation for the opportunities and responsibilities which exist in a democratic society concerning the arts.

· by encouraging involvement in civic affairs through music and the allied arts.

 

MUSIC PROGRAM

The School of Music provides professional training for qualified students in the following degree programs:

                                Bachelor of Music in Music Education

                                Bachelor of Music in Performance

                                Bachelor of Music in Composition

                                Bachelor of Sacred Music

                                Bachelor of Arts in Music

All curricula stress sound musicianship, active musical experience, knowledge of theoretical and practical issues in the field of specialization, acquaintance with the professional literature both sacred and secular as well as responsible participation in all phases of instruction.  Graduates will have prepared for careers as performers, ministers of music, organist and choir directors, composers and teachers of music in public and private elementary and secondary schools.  Graduates are also qualified for advanced studies in graduate schools.

 

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM

All students, freshman and transfer, are admitted to the music program on the basis of an audition, teacher recommendation and written essay.  The audition is generally scheduled following the student’s acceptance by the college.  Prospective music majors may, upon request, audition for the music faculty prior to submitting an application for admission to the college.  Prospective students who reside within a 200-mile radius of the college are requested to audition in person before the music faculty.  Prospective students living outside the 200-mile radius may submit a taped audition (audio or video) for review by the music faculty. 

 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT

Placement tests in music theory, ear training and sight-singing are given to all new music majors during Freshman Orientation.  Students who display competence in any of these areas may waive one or both semesters of the first year courses. 

AP exam with separate  sub-scores for Music Theory and Aural Skills:

Score of 3-5 on AP Music Theory exam = MUS123 Elementary Music Theory  (3 credits)

Score of 3-5 on AP Aural Skills exam = MUS121 Elem. Ear Training/S.S.  (1 credit)

Note: Students with AP Music Theory credits are still required to take Nyack’s music theory and ear training placement exams.  In some cases, students may be required to take freshman theory or ear training even though they also receive AP credits.  Such AP credits would count as electives.  On the other hand, students with a score of 3-5 on the AP exam, who test very high on Nyack’s placement exams may receive up to 8 credits in theory and ear training upon the recommendation of the music faculty.

Music Education majors with a strong piano background may also waive the beginning Functional Piano courses by audition.

For more information, contact the Dean of the School of Music.

 

DEGREE OFFERINGS

 

MUSIC EDUCATION MAJOR – B.M.

The Music Education major is designed for the training of teachers in elementary and secondary school music in accordance with the requirements of the Division of Teacher Education and Certification of the Department of Higher Education of the Sate of New York.  In New York, permanent certification for teaching in the public schools is open only to those holding a master’s degree and having two years teaching experience; this curriculum, therefore, leads to recommendation for the provisional certificate for teaching (K-12) in the elementary, middle and high schools of New York.  The State of New York certification procedures require that recommended students make personal application for this provisional certificate. The State of New York also requires that periodic testing administered for and that students demonstrate competency by passing these tests—list and reward students will receive individualized programs detailing required examinations and dates of administration. Education students must pass these tests  in order to be admitted to upper division classes.

Graduates are also qualified to direct music in churches and to teach music on the mission field in schools for children of missionaries and government officials.  The teacher education program of Nyack College has been approved by the Certification Commission of the Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) for the preparation of teachers for ministry in Christian school education.

The focus of this course is the development of well-rounded and effective teachers.  The inclusion of Bible courses makes an ideal program for one who wishes to serve both the community and church interests.

In addition to the general admission requirements listed in the Nyack College catalog, applicants will be expected to have satisfactory scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board (generally 920 or more).  Applicants wishing to transfer into the program in cases where the SAT scores are insufficient or not readily available will be expected to present a grade point average of not less than 2.25 on a four-point scale.

140 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree.  See catalog.

 

PIANO or ORGAN PERFORMANCE MAJOR – B.M.

ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE MAJOR – B.M.

The experiences in these degree programs are designed to prepare qualified students for graduate study and professional pursuits in these fields.

Applied requirements for performance majors include major and minor areas of performance.  For graduation, proficiency in the applied minor shall be at the first year level required for majors.  Organ, Harpsichord or Instrumental majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.

126 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Performance degree.  See catalog.

 

 

VOCAL PERFORMANCE MAJOR – B.M.

This degree program is designed to prepare qualified students for professional performance careers, graduate study in voice, and teaching voice privately.  Graduates of this program often become choral directors, soloists in oratorios and operas, and solo recording artists.

Applied requirements for voice majors include major and minor areas of performance.  For graduation, proficiency in the applied minor shall be at the first year level required for majors. Voice majors not minoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.

126 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music in Performance degree.  See catalog.

 

CHURCH MUSIC MAJOR - S.M.B.

The Church Music major is designed to train musicians for leadership positions in the church as ministers of music, organists, and choir directors.  The course of study includes two years of approved fieldwork in church music under supervision of a faculty member designated by the Dean of the School of Music.

Applied requirements for Church Music majors include major and minor areas of performance.  For graduation, proficiency in the applied minor shall be at the first year level required for majors.  Church Music majors not majoring or minoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.

126 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Sacred Music degree.  See catalog.

 

COMPOSITION MAJOR – B.M.

This degree program is designed to prepare qualified students for careers in the fields of composition and arranging, as well as graduate study in these fields.

Applied requirements for composition majors include a major area of performance, and each student will present a senior recital (one hour in length) of original compositions organized, conducted, or performed by the student.  Composition majors not majoring in piano will be required to pass a Piano Proficiency exam.

126 credit hours are required for the Bachelor of Music degree.  See catalog.

 

LIBERAL ARTS MUSIC MAJOR - B.A.

The B.A. in Music program affords students the opportunity to study music primarily from a liberal arts perspective.  It provides a strong foundation in music literature and history, theory and ear training, and consistent studies in performance areas, both individual and ensemble.  This program is designed to serve students having solid intellectual interests and a commitment to aesthetic and artistic values.  Students may also pursue significant studies in other liberal arts areas such as English, Psychology, Philosophy, Religion, or History.

Depending upon the secondary areas of concentration, graduates of this program are prepared for careers in music-related fields, such as church music ministries, music business, management, marketing, public relations, recording, radio and television, music theater and communications.  Students may also pursue graduate studies in musicology, music education, and other music-related fields.

126 credit hours are required to the Bachelor of Arts degree.  See catalog.

 

STUDENT ADVISEMENT

Students majoring in music are assigned an advisor by the Director of the Music Program during the fall semester of the freshman year.  This advisor is a full-time faculty member who serves as the academic advisor and will counsel the music student throughout their course of study at Nyack College.    While all changes in registration require the signature of the faculty advisor, it is the primary responsibility of the student to maintain comprehensive files of academic progress and accept full responsibility for completing all degree requirements.

The student’s personal advisement file should include:

· pre-registration forms.

· grade reports from each semester at Nyack College.

· any and all in-house documentation and correspondence affecting course of study.

· projections for course completion at Nyack College leading to graduation.

· all documentation as a transfer student to Nyack College including a copy of the catalog and transcript from the former school

 

PRIVATE LESSONS

 

Music majors normally register for 60-minute lessons (2 credits) in their major performing area each semester and 30-minute lessons (1 credit) in their minor performing area.  With permission, students may register for 3 credits during the preparation of a junior or senior recital.  The private lesson instructors assign semester grades which reflect the student’s progress and performance.

Applied instruction is an integral part of the overall program for each student.  Adequate practice time needs to be scheduled to assure progress in both the major and minor areas.  The following guidelines are considered to be the minimum:

1 credit per semester 3 hours of practice per week

2 credits per semester 6 hours of practice per week

It is the responsibility of the student to purchase any and all music scores required by the instructor as soon as they are assigned.  Music can be ordered by phone at Joseph Patelson Music House in New York City, or through Cliff Hill Music in New Jersey.  These are two of the finest in the country and they will accept major credit cards.   

Joseph Patelson Music House            212-582-5840                     www.patelson.com

Cliff Hill Music                                          800-819-8772                    www.cliffhillmusic.com

Students are expected to adhere to their scheduled time for private lessons.  Attendance at all private lessons is mandatory and absolutely no unexcused absences or “cuts” are allowed.  The following policies will help in planning for your lessons each semester: 

 

WEEKLY LESSON GUIDELINES

· If students miss lessons for any reason without notifying the teacher 24 hours in advance, the lesson is not made up.  Teachers may assign a zero grade for lesson cuts.

· The student and teacher should establish the method for communicating with each other (e-mail, phone—please refer to the , campus mail) at the first lesson each semester. Students are responsible for responding to their teacher’s communications.

· If students or teachers miss lessons due to illness, required field trips, or professional commitments, it is up to the teacher to schedule makeup lessons. Students must supply documentation for illness (from the doctor) or field trip participation (from the professor.)

· Students need to complete 13 lessons per semester or 12 lessons and 1 master class in order to receive credit for private lessons.

· “Left over” make up lessons may be scheduled during final exam week when necessary.

 

JURY EXAMS

 

Music majors enrolled in a professional music degree program (B.M. or S.M.B.) are required to satisfy a certain level of performance in addition to the completion of the minimum number of credits in applied music.  In some cases, this will require additional hours of applied music.

 

Music majors (except those in the B.A. program) are required to perform jury exams in their major area at the end of each semester.  Minor juries and piano proficiency juries are taken only during the spring semester, however, students may request to take minor and piano proficiency juries in the fall if they wish to satisfy the requirements.  Juries are normally scheduled at the beginning of the final exam period. All students will take juries in the Spring Semester, BM Students, both semesters.

 

Students will receive an NC (no credit) grade if they do not perform their jury exam.  The NC will automatically change to FX  if the jury is not made up within 30 days.

In the cases of illness and dire emergencies, the private lesson teacher may submit to the Music Office a written recommendation and request for a jury postponement. This request should include supportive information from the proper authorities. A make-up jury may then be scheduled in the early part of the following semester.

Students performing a junior or senior recital perform a recital jury four weeks prior to the recital. (For detailed information see page 52.)

 

Piano and voice juries are to be performed by memory.

Music Education majors will perform a jury exam in Functional Piano during finals week of the fall and spring semesters until the proficiency examination is passed.  The purpose of the jury examination is to determine whether the minimal standard required for music educators has been met.

At the end of this booklet, a sample copy of a Jury Form has been provided.  This form is to be typed using computers, and copies brought to the jury exam. It is the responsibility of the student to have all forms thoroughly prepared for the jury exam, as no incomplete forms will be accepted under any circumstances. Near the end of each semester, Jury Forms may be easily processed on the computers located in the school computer Lab.  Jury Forms may be obtained from the Music Office.

 

The information that follows will serve as a general guide to the levels of competence that are expected in each area of performance.

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

for Applied Minors, Functional Piano, and Piano Proficiency

 

· How does a student choose an applied minor?

Music majors in professional degree programs who demonstrate the potential to reach the level of the appropriate minor requirements within approximately four semesters of college study may minor in any applied area offered by the college.

· How does one qualify to minor in a specific applied area?

By audition.  Those who have received training prior to college may be approved for their minor area on the basis of their entrance audition.  Others will be approved on the basis of a jury exam following one semester of college study (December or May jury Exam.)  The music faculty will make the final decision in consultation with the private instructor. 

· When should a student select their applied minor?

As early as possible in the program.  The freshman year is preferable to allow ample time to complete the minor requirements.

· What are the requirements for satisfying the applied minor?

The first year level for the applied major area as stated in the School of Music Handbook.  (Note: the piano minor requirements are divided into two years for clarity.)

· When should students take their minor juries?

Minor juries take place during May juries of the first and second year, or until the student passes their jury exam.  Students who desire to satisfy their minor requirement during a fall semester may elect to take a minor jury exam in December. 

· How does a student know when they have passed their minor requirement?

They will receive a letter from the School of Music upon successful completion of the minor requirement and minor jury exam.

· What happens if a student fails a jury?

An “NC” (no credit) grade will be given.  In order to continue in their applied minor, the NC jury needs to be retaken and passed by the beginning of the following semester.

 

 What is the difference between Functional Piano, Piano Minor, and Piano Proficiency?                

 

Functional Piano (MUS 101, 102, 201, 202) classes prepare Music Education majors to accompany in the school classroom. Functional Piano serves as the applied minor for Music Education majors who are not piano or organ majors.

Piano Minors study privately and are required to demonstrate piano skills approximately equivalent to the first year level required for piano majors as described in the School of Music Handbook.

Piano Proficiency is the minimum level of piano skill required for all music majors in the professional degree programs (B.M., B.S.M.) who are not majoring or minoring in piano, organ, or Functional Piano.  Students may need to study privately for a few semesters to achieve the Piano Proficiency level as described in the School of Music Handbook.

 

May non-Music Education majors select Functional Piano as their applied minor?

  

No.  Functional Piano courses are designed exclusively for Music Education majors.

 

 

RECOMMENDED REPERTOIRE

 

· Major in Piano Performance

 

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory at least two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo.                                                                                                             

 Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach - Sinfonia Two or Three-Part Inventions or a Prelude and Fugue (WTC I); 2) an Allegro movement from an early sonata by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven (e.g. Haydn - D Major, Hob. XVI: 37, Mozart - K. 282 or Beethoven - Op. 79; 3) Schubert - Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2; 4.) Khachaturian - Toccata.   Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece.

First Year: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 70-80, arpeggios = 60-70). 

Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Two or Three-part Inventions,  Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniments.  

Second Year:  All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90.                              Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.                        

 Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty.                                  

 Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

Third Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of junior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty.

Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work.

Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

Fourth Year: Advanced study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 100-120, arpeggios = 90-100) and preparation of senior recital.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - large works. 2) Classical: Late Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Chopin, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century composition of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt, Bartók ,Godowsky & Debussy. Contemporary/20th Century: Ravel –Le Tombeau de Couperin; Jeux d’Eau; Sonatas by Prokofiev; Ginastera, Scriabin, Copland, and Barber; Albeniz – Iberia (any piece); Crumb – Five Piano Pieces, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty.

Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century American work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment and other larger chamber music works. 

Requirements for Piano Performance Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and three selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles from the following list. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury. During the semesters of junior and senior recitals, the recital juries take the place of the regular juries.  

 

· Major in Church Music –piano majors

 

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios, and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo.  Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces in contrasting styles from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach – Two part inventions; 2) Clementi – Sonatina Op. 36; 3) Chopin – Preludes Op. 28 (Any one) 4.)Bartok – Sonatina.  Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece. 

First and Second Years: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 60-80, arpeggios = 50-70).  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

Third Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

Fourth Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of senior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

Requirements for Church Music Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury. During the semester of senior recital, the recital jury takes the place of the regular jury.

 

· Major in Music Education –Piano Majors

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios, and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo.  Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces in contrasting styles from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach – Two part inventions; 2) Clementi – Sonatina Op. 36; 3) Chopin – Preludes Op. 28 (Any one) 4.)Bartok – Sonatina.  Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece. 

First and Second Years: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 60-80, arpeggios = 50-70). Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

Third Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment.  An oratorio chorus piano accompaniment  (e.g. J.S. Bach – Cantatas; Vivaldi – Gloria; Mendelssohn - Elijah; Handel - Messiah, Judas Maccabaeus; Verdi – Requiem; Rutter – Requiem.)  

Fourth Year: Continued study of scales and arpeggios at four notes to a beat (scales = 90-100, arpeggios = 80-90) and preparation of senior recital. Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC with 4/5 vcs.), English Suites, Partitas, Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue, Fantasy and Fugue in a; Italian Concerto. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Sonatas by Schubert; Mendelssohn, Schumann and Brahms; and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Etudes by Chopin, Rachmaninoff, Scriabin, Liszt. Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy - L’Isle joyeuse, Ravel – Miroirs, Valse Nobles et Sentimentales; Prokofiev – Sonata No. 3 Op. 28; Scriabin – Sonata No. 2 Op. 19, No. 4 Op. 30; Albeniz –Suite Española; Crumb – Dream Images, and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Jury Repertoire must include an etude and a twentieth century work. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment.  An oratorio chorus piano accompaniment  (e.g. J.S. Bach – Cantatas; Vivaldi – Gloria; Mendelssohn - Elijah; Handel - Messiah, Judas Maccabaeus; Verdi – Requiem; Rutter – Requiem.)  

Requirements for Music Education Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. A movement of a standard piano concerto may replace two solo pieces during the semester of concerto jury.  During the semester of senior recital, the recital jury takes the place of the regular jury.

Functional Piano Requirement:  Piano majors must take MUS301, Advanced Functional Piano, and pass the jury exam.

 

· Major in Composition –piano majors

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform by memory at least two compositions in contrasting styles in addition to scales, arpeggios and sight-reading. Scales & Arpeggios: Major and minor (harmonic) scales up to three sharp and flat keys, four octaves of scales and arpeggios (triads) in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat at a moderate tempo. Solo Repertoire: Choose two pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) J.S. Bach - Sinfonia or a Prelude and Fugue (WTC I); 2) an Allegro movement from an early sonata by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven (e.g. Haydn - D Major, Hob. XVI: 37, Mozart - K. 282 or Beethoven - Op. 79; 3) Schubert - Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2; 4.) Khachaturian - Toccata. Sight-Reading: Applicants may be asked to sight-read a simple song or four-part piece.

First Year: Four octaves of all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 50-60, arpeggios = 40-50).  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty): 1) Baroque: J.S. Bach - Sinfonias, Preludes and Fugues (WTC I); two Sonatas by Scarlatti or Soler. 2) Classical: Early Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven (mvts. I/III; mvt. II has to be combined with either I or III). 3) Romantic: Chopin – Mazurkas, Waltzes, Nocturnes; Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words; Brahms – Intermezzi; Schubert –Impromptus; Schumann Op. 1, 2, 12, 15, 18, 19* 21, 23, 28; 82; Liszt - Consolations and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy – Preludes, Children’s Corner, Suite Bergamasque; Bartok – Suite Op. 14, Allegro Barbaro; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Hymns and vocal accompaniment.  

Second Year: All major and minor (natural, harmonic and melodic) scales one octave apart, and also in thirds, sixths, tenths, and chromatic scales = 80-90. Arpeggios: all major and minor arpeggios in triads, dominant and diminished seventh chords, in root position and inversions = 70-80.  Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty: 1) Baroque: Bach - Preludes and Fugues (WTC II), French Suites. 2) Classical: Sonatas by Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 3) Romantic: Mendelssohn – Variations Serieuse; Schubert – Impromptus, Sonatas; Schumann Op. 6, 7, 9, 26; Brahms – Variations, Liszt – Liebesträume, Concert Etudes; Hungarian Rhapsodies, and other 19th century compositions of comparable difficulty. 4) Contemporary/20th Century: Debussy –Preludes, Estampes, Images 1905, Suite pour le piano; Ravel – Sonatine; Prokofiev – Visions Fugitives, Sonata No. 3; Rachmaninoff – Preludes; Gershwin – Preludes; Albeniz – España; Ginastera – Danzas Argentinas; Messiaen – Preludes; Webern – Variations Op. 27; Crawford Seeger – Four Preludes; and other 20th century compositions of comparable difficulty. Sight-Reading: Vocal, choral and instrumental accompaniment. 

Requirements for Composition Piano Juries: Memorized scales and arpeggios and two selections of solo repertoire in contrasting styles at the end of each semester. Music may be used for the solo repertoire. No juries required during the semester of senior recital.

 

· Piano Minors in All Degree Programs

 

Students minoring in piano will normally use the following two-year curriculum to meet the piano minor requirement:

 

First Year: Two octaves of all major scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 50, arpeggios = 40). 

 

Solo Repertoire: Choose 2 pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty:

· J.S. Bach – Two Part Invention

· Clementi – Sonatinas, Op. 36

· Chopin – Preludes Op. 28  (any one)

· Bartok – Sonatina

· Debussy – Arabesques. 

Second Year: Four octaves of all major and (harmonic) minor scales and arpeggios in parallel motion, played with hands together one octave apart, at four notes to a beat (scales = 60, arpeggios = 50). 

 

Solo Repertoire: Choose pieces from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty:

· J.S. Bach –  Sinfonia or a Prelude and Fugue (WTC I)

· An Allegro movement from an early sonata by Haydn, Mozart, or Beethoven.

i.e.: Haydn - D Major, Hob. XVI: 37;   Mozart - K. 282;  Beethoven - Op. 79

· Schubert - Impromptu Op. 142, No. 2

· Debussy – Preludes (any one) 

Jury Requirements: Minor juries are required to be taken during all spring semesters of piano study until the minor level is satisfied.  However, students may request to take a piano minor jury in the fall if they wish to satisfy the requirements.  Students are expected to perform scales and arpeggios by memory, and two solo selections in contrasting styles.  Music may be used for the solo repertoire.  

The music faculty will determine if the student has satisfied the minor level requirement in piano on the basis of the jury examination.  The student will be notified by letter when he/she has met the minor level requirement.

 

 Piano Proficiency in All Degree Programs

These requirements pertain to students not majoring or minoring in piano, but who are satisfying the minimum level of piano proficiency required for the B. M. and B.S.M. degrees.  Note: Students having piano background may take the Piano Proficiency Exam upon request during any semester.

 

Technical Requirements: Students are required to perform by memory one octave scales in all keys (major and harmonic minor), hands separately two notes to a beat (minimum = 50), I-IV-V-I chords, hands together, in all keys.

Solo Repertoire: Choose one piece from the following list or compositions equivalent in difficulty:

· J.S. Bach – Two Part Invention

· Clementi – Sonatinas, Op. 36

· Chopin – Preludes Op. 28

· Bartok – Sonatina

· Debussy – Arabesques. 

Accompanying Skills:

· Voice majors: simple art song accompaniment, a 4-part hymn, and vocalize exercises.

· Instrumental majors - simple instrumental accompaniment

      (e. g., Suzuki Level 1 or 2, or a  4-part hymn)

· Composition majors – student’s own original accompaniment, a 4-part hymn.

· Church Music majors -  simple octavo accompaniment and playing vocal parts, a 4-part hymn, and vocalise exercises. 

Jury Requirements: Piano Proficiency juries are required to be taken during all spring semesters of piano study until the minimum proficiency level is satisfied.  However, students may request to take Piano Proficiency juries in the fall if they wish to satisfy the requirements.  Music may be used for the jury exam.

The music faculty will determine if the student has satisfied the proficiency level requirement in piano on the basis of the jury examination.  The student will be notified by letter when he/she has met the Piano Proficiency requirement.

· Major in Organ

Requirements for Entrance: Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.

First Year: Technical requirements: studies in manual and pedal techniques in Gleason, Johnson, Peeters, and Nilson.  Early works by Froberger, Pachelbel, Dandrieu and Bull. Buxtehude – Praeludia (Praeludium in F Major) and Chorale Preludes. Bach – Eight Little Preludes and Fuges, & Orgelbuchlein. 19th century composers such as Mendelssohn, Brahms -Eleven Chorale Preludes, and Vierne -Twenty-four Pieces.  20th Century American composers such as Rorem, Pinkham and Locklair.  Hymn playing.  Jury requirements: Fall: Bach – Chorale Preludes from Das Orgelbuchlein; One of the Eight Little Preludes and Fuges; prepare a hymn.  Spring: Buxtehude – Praeludia; a contrasting work from a different period; sight read a hymn.

Second Year: Technical requirements: continuation of the above.  Early works by Frescobaldi, Sweelinck, Du Mage and Clerambault.  Buxtehude – Praeludia (Prelude, Fugue and Ciacona) or Lubeck – Praeludia.  Bach – Little Fuge in G Minor, Prelude and Fuge in C Minor (BWV 549) or Toccata D Minor (BWV 565), Chorale Preludes from the Great Eighteen.  Franck – Pastorale, Prelude, Fugue and Variation, and Cantabile.  Reger – Thirty Short Chorale Preludes.  Additional 20th Century American Works by Persichetti and Rorem.  Anthem Accompaniment.  Jury requirements:  Fall: Bach – a larger work such as the Little Fuge in G Minor; a contrasting work by an early composer; prepare an anthem accompaniment.  Spring:  Bach –  a Prelude and Fuge; a contrasting work from a different period; sightread an anthem accompaniment.

Third Year:  Early works by J. Praetorius, Scheidemann or D’Aquin.  Buxtehude – Praeludia in F# Minor or G Minor.  Bach – Trio Sonatas, Prelude and Fuge in G Major (BWV 541.)  Mendelssohn – Sonatas.  Widor – Symphonies (selected movements.)  Works by Langlais, Messiaen, or Dupre.  A large scale work by a 20th Century American Composer such as William Bolcom or William Albright.  Score reading and Transposition.  Jury requirements: Fall: Buxtehude – Praeludia; a work from the Renaissance or Early Baroque; a 20th century American work; prepare an unaccompanied anthem in open score; prepare a transposition of a hymn.  Spring:  Bach – Prelude and Fuge; a work from the Romantic Period; a 20th century American work; read an unaccompanied anthem in open score, transpose a hymn at sight.

Fourth Year: Early works by Schlick, Byrd and Gibbons.  Bruhns – Praeludia Bach – Passacaglia (BWV 582), Prelude and Fuge in E-flat Major (BWV 552), Toccata, Adiago and Fuge (BWV 564.)  Vierne – Symphonies (selected movements.)  Tournemire – Movements from L’Orgue Mystique.  Distler – Organ partitas.  A large scale work by a 20th Century American Composer such as Organ Sonata – Vincent Persichetti.  Improvisation.  Jury requirements:  Fall:  Bach – Prelude and Fuge; a work from the Renaissance or early Baroque; a work from the Romantic Period; a 20th century work; prepare a hymn improvisation.  Spring:  The student should be prepared to play their Senior Recital; improvise on a selected hymn.

· Major in Voice

Required Repertory:

 

This is a guide as each student will have individual needs.  All repertory must be approved by the teacher.  Generally, each student, should try to have five songs memorized each semester for one hour students and 3 for ½ hour students.  While this is not absolute, all songs learned will be listed on the jury forms, and we should try to maintain this level of scholarship.  If a student consistently does not learn enough repertory they will fail their jury and be dropped as majors.  Repertory will be assigned appropriate for the age and ability of the singer.  If voice is the secondary instruments, or the student is a non-major, requirements are entirely up to the teacher as is recital participation.  However, Education Majors are required to perform and do juries each semester and if voice is the second instrument they need perform only once a year.

 

Repertory Guidelines:  Entering students should perform at least two contrasting compositions.  To enter the four-year course in voice, the student should be able to sing with a clear sound, on pitch, with good phrasing and musical perception in clear English.  The students should also demonstrate their knowledge of the rudiments of music and their ability to sight-read a simple song. To be considered for a scholarship the student must show a voice of promise in two different languages. The student should have an elementary knowledge of the piano if at all possible.

 

First Year:  Technical requirements: proper command of legato and breathing; improved ability in diction in English and Italian, consistent sound blending throughout the registers, and an understanding of the dynamic range of the voice.  Vocalizes according to the need of the student and the repertory should be contrasting in both style and tempo.  At least ten new songs required, five to be sung from memory, each semester.  Christian classics, especially Spirituals, 16th century English, and Italian arias, oratorio arias, Folk Songs, contemporary art songs or Broadway arias of moderate difficulty.  Individual requirements including a recommended listening list of vocal repertoire may be assigned by the teacher.

 

Second Year:  Continuation of everything above and begin studies in coloratura technique and/or accompanied and secco recitatives and at least one Oratorio aria by Mendelssohn, Handel, Haydn or Mozart.  Begin the study of German lieder; simple operatic arias; and add American repertoire, such as Copland, or Barber.

 

Third Year: Continuation of everything above and add a coloratura aria with a secco recitative. Study more advanced German lieder and add French art songs.  More difficult operatic arias; arias from the vocal works of J.S. Bach; more difficult contemporary songs; Russian and/or Spanish songs.  Junior recital.

 

Fourth Year:  Preparation of senior recital.  The recital should include the major representative works from song and opera literature.  Participation in Chamber Music, Opera Workshop, or Early music ensemble is required in the senior year is suggested each year of attendance

· Major in Horn

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Technical requirements: all major and minor scales, study of the transpositions commonly used for horn.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 3; Pottag-Andraud Method, Book 1.  Solo material of the difficulty of Mozart, Concerto No. 2.

Second Year:  Continuation of transpositions; orchestra excerpts.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 4; Pottag-Andraud Method, Books 1 and 2.  Solo material of the difficulty of Mozart, Concerti No. 1 and 3.

Third Year:  Continuation of orchestral studies; Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 5; Pottag-Andraud Method, Book 2.  Schumann - Adagio and Allegro; R. Strauss - Concerto No. 1; Hindemith - Concerto for Horn and Sonata for Horn; solos by Stevens and Beversdorf.

Fourth Year:  Continuation of orchestral studies.  Maxime-Alphonse Method, Book 6; Reynolds - Forty-two Etudes; Mozart - Concerto No. 4; R. Strauss - Concerto No. 2; Gliere - Concerto; solos by Jacob and Tomasi and other works of comparable difficulty.

· Major in Trombone

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Technical requirements: development of embouchure, breathing, staccato, and legato tonguing; tenor clef reading.  Arban and Cornette methods; Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. 1; Mantia, The Trombone Virtuoso.  Paris Conservatoire solo material by Barat, de la Nux, Busser, Croce-Spinelli, and others of comparable difficulty.

Second Year:  Technical requirements: continuation of tenor clef and introduction of alto clef reading.  Continuation of Bordogni-Rochut and manti studies; clef studies by Blazevitch, Stefaniszin; LaFosse, School for Sight-reading, Vol. A-B; Kopprasch, Selected Studies, Vol. 1. Solo material from Solo Book No. 1 (E. Glover), Paris Conservatoire solos by Busser, Pfieffer, and Saint-Saens; Galliard, Six Sonatas; Blazevitch, Concert Piece No. 5; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

Third Year:  Continuation of clef studies; LaFosse, Vol. C-E; Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. II; Kopprasch, Selected Studies Vol. II; Vobaron, 34 Etudes; Aaron Harris, Method, Vol. II; Kreutzer-Schaefer, 10 Etudes.  Solo material from Solo Book No. 2 (E. Glover); solos by Guilmant, Sonatas; Handel-LaFosse, Concerto in F minor; Hindemith, Sonata; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

Fourth Year:  LaFosse, Advanced Method, Vol. II.  Bordogni-Rochut, Melodious Etudes, Vol. III; Blazevitch, Equences.  Etudes by Bitsch, Bozza, Boutry, and Pichaureau.  Bach--LaFosse, Suites for Unaccompanied Violincello; solos by Defay, Berghmans, Salzedo, and Tomasi.  Creton, Fantasy; Bloch, Symphony; Takacs, Sonata; Martin, Ballade; Corello-Gibson, Sonata in D minor; and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire

· Major in Trumpet

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year: Emphasis on fundamental techniques of tone production and articulation.   Studies of Arban, Clarke, Sachse, and Scholossberg.  Solos by Balay, Bozza, Goedicke, Hovhaness, Nelhybel, and Purcell.

Second Year:  Emphasis on transposition and solo repertoire.  Studies of Bousquet, Brandt, Sachse, and Bartold.  Solos of Barat, Corelli, Frackenpohl, Haydn, Kennan, Peeters, and Copland.

Third Year:  Emphasis on solo and orchestral repertoire.  Use of the C and D trumpets.  Studies of Bartold, Brandt, Charlier, and Harris.  Solos of Bozza, Enesco, Giannini, Hindemith, Hummel, Kaminski, Riisager, and Torelli in preparation of a junior recital.

Fourth Year:  Continuation of solo and orchestral repertoire.  Studies of Bartold, Bitsch, Charlier, Petit, and Tomasi.  Solos of Addison, Bitsch, Honegger, Pakmutova, Stevens, and Telemann in preparation of a senior recital.

· Major in Tuba

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Technical requirements – development of embouchure, breathing, staccato, and legato tonguing.  All major scales.  Etudes by Fink, Tyrell, Blazevich.  Solos by Bach, Haddad, Holmes, and works of comparable difficulty.

Second Year:  Technical requirements – all major and minor scales.  Etudes by Bordogni-Rochut, Kopprasch and Blazhevich.  Solos by Barat, McKay, Hogg, Childs, and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

Third Year:  Technical requirements – all major and minor scales.  Etudes by Bordogni-Rochut, Sear, Ostrander.  Solos by Morris, Vivaldi, Ross, Hartly and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages form the orchestral repertoire.

Fourth Year:  Technical requirements – All major and minor scales, scales in thirds and fourths.  Etudes by Maenz, Bordogni-Rochut and Kopprasch.  Solos by Stevens, Tomasi, Vaughan Williams, Hindemith and works of comparable difficulty.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

· Major in Violin

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  To enter the four-year course in violin, the student should be able to play three octave major and minor scales and arpeggios, at moderate speed.  The student should also have the ability to perform works with the difficulty of the Kreutzer Etudes and concerti by Viotti, Nardini, Vivaldi, and J.S. Bach.  Elementary knowledge of the piano desirable.

First Year: Technical requirements: further facility in major and minor scales and arpeggios.  This is a requirement for each of the four years of the undergraduate curriculum.  Studies by Dont, Mazas, and Kreutzer.  Concerti by J.S. Bach, Kreutzer, Nardini, Rode, and Viotti.  Sonatas by Corelli and Handel; works of comparable difficulty.

Second Year:  Studies by Fiorillo, Kreutzer, and Rode.  Concerti by de Beriot, Haydn, Mozart, Rode, Spohr, and Viotti.  Sonatas by Leclair, Mozart, and Nardini.  Solo pieces by Beethoven and Kreisler.

Third Year: Studies by Campagnoli, Dont, Fiorillo, and Rode.  Concerti by Bruch, Mendelssohn, Mozart, and Spohr.  Sonatas by J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and Vivaldi.  Passages from the orchestra repertoire.

Fourth Year:  Advanced technical studies by Gavinies, Rovelli, and Wieniawski; preparation of senior recital.  Concerti by Barber, Beethoven, Dvorak, Lalo, Paganini, Saint-Saens, Vieuxtemps, and Wieniawski.  Sonatas by J.S. Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Franck, Faure, and Schubert.  Solo pieces by Bartok, Chausson, Saint-Saens, Sarasate, Vitali, and Wieniawski.  Passages from the orchestral repertoire.

· Major in Guitar

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Diatonic major and minor scales in open positions, two and three octaves; Barrer; simple pieces by Sor, Carcassi, Giaulianni, Carulli, and Renaissance or contemporary composers; proper nail care; use of free and rest strokes.

Second Year:  Dynamic technique; simple pieces by the above mentioned composers.

Third Year:  Completion of scales -- Barrer and dynamic techniques; pieces by Bach; short sonata; Preludes, Etudes by Villa-Lobos.

Fourth Year:  One sonata by a classic composer; a suite by Bach, Weiss, etc.; Theme and Variations from Classical or early Romantic period; two pieces of suitable length, one by a Renaissance composer and another by a contemporary composer.

· Major in Clarinet

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Technical requirements: through study of major and minor scales and arpeggios with different articulations.  Perier - Le Debutant Clarinettiste Rose - 3 books.  Clerisse - Promenade.  Gade - Fantasiestucke.  Stamitz - Concerto in E Flat.  Mozart - Concerto in A.  Weber - Variations.

Second Year:  Technical requirements: major and minor scales and arpeggios with increased speed; major and minor scales in thirds; chromatic scales; transposition for A clarinet.  Blancou - Forty Etudes Jean-Jean - Books I and II.  Schumann - Fantasiestucke.  Weber - Concerto No. 1.  Williams - Six Studies in English Folk Song.  Brahms - Sonata No. 2 (or comparable works).

Third Year:  Technical requirements: review of previous work with increased speed; augmented, diminished, seventh arpeggios; continued transpositions at various intervals.  Cavallini - Thirty Caprices Jean-Jean - Book III. Bitsch - Twelve Etudes of Rhythm.  Weber - Grand Duo Concertante.  Debussy - Premiere Rhapsodie, Spohr - Concerto No. 1.  Brahms -Sonata No. 1.  Saint-Saens - Sonata.

Fourth Year:  Technical requirements: review of previous work with increased speed and with more difficult articulation; whole tone scales; continued transpositions at various intervals.  Stark - The Art of Transposition (Rahter, 2 vols.), Orchestral Studies.  Weber - Concerto No. 2.  Hindemith - Sonata.  Copland - Concerto.  Reger -- Sonata in F# (or in B flat).  Stamitz - Concerto for Clarinet and Strings.  Stravinsky - Three Pieces (or comparable works).

 

· Major in Flute

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions of contrasting style, scales and arpeggios, and sightreading.   Admission is contingent upon the audition, which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:

Scales and Arpeggios: Two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major keys; three-octave chromatic scale

Technical Studies/Etude/Method books:

Andersen op. 41; Berbiguier 18 Etudes; Cavally Melodious and Progressive Studies, book I; Clardy Flute Fundamentals; Gariboldi Etudes; Hovey Daily  Exercises for Flute; Moyse 24 and 25 Little Etudes; Soussmann Complete Method for Flute; Vester 100 Classical Studies; Webb and Thorson Building the Tone from the Bottom Up; Wye Practice Books (tone, vol. I)

Solo Repertoire:Devienne Concerto in D major; Faure Fantaisie; Gluck Dance of the Blessed Spirits; Handel Sonatas; Telemann Sonatas and Suite in A minor; Quantz Concerto in G major

Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir:  Beethoven; Boismortier; Mozart; Quantz; Telemann; etc.

Second Year:

Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor keys; three-octave chromatic scale. Technical Studies/Etude/Method books:Altes 26 Selected Studies; Andersen op. 33; Cavally Melodious and Progressive Studies, book II; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Moyse De La Sonorité, Wye Practice Books.

Solo Repertoire:C.P.E. Bach Sonata in A minor for solo flute; J.S. Bach Sonatas in E-flat major, C major, and G minor, Suite in B minor; Chaminade Concertino, Debussy Syrinx;  Doppler Hungarian Fantasy; Handel Sonatas; Honegger Danse de la Chevre; Hummel Sonata in D major; Mozart Concerto in G major; Muczynski Three Preludes for solo flute; Telemann Twelve Fantasias.

Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir:Beethoven Trio; Boismortier; Haydn London Trios; Kuhlau Duets, Trios; Kummer Flute Trio; Loeillet Trio Sonata in E minor; Reicha; Telemann Tafel Musik.

Third Year:

Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor keys with all articulations, double tongue, triple tongue; three-octave chromatic scale, with all articulations, double tongue, triple tongue.

Technical Studies/Etude/Method books: Andersen op. 24; Drouet Etudes; Fürstenau 26 Exercises; Hughes op. 75; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Piazzola Tango Etudes; Taffanel/Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises.

Solo Repertoire: C.P.E. Bach Hamburg Sonata, Concerto in D minor; J.S. Bach Sonatas in A major and E major; Enesco Cantabile et Presto; Griffes Poem; Hindemith 8 Pieces for Solo Flute, Sonata; Hoover Kokopeli for solo flute; Hüe Fantaisie; Karg-Elert Sonata Appassionata for solo flute; Kuhlau Fantaisies for solo flute; La Montaine Sonata for solo flute; Mozart Concerto in D major; Reinecke Undine Sonata.

Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Bozza Flute Quartet; Doppler; Ibert Two Interludes; Kuhlau Quartet; Mozart Flute Quartets; Muczynski Duets; Reicha Flute Quartet, Rossini Wind Quartets.

Orchestral Excerpts:Major orchestral flute solos (Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Dvorak, Hindemith, Mendelssohn, Prokofieff, Ravel, Rossini, Saint-Saëns, Strauss,  etc.)

Fourth Year:

Scales and Arpeggios: two-octave scales and arpeggios in all major and minor key with all articulations, double and triple tongue, three-octave chromatic scales, with all articulations.

Technical Studies/Etude/Method books:Casterede Twelve Studies; Jean-Jean Etudes; Karg-Elert 30 Caprices; Paganini  24 Caprices; Reichert Daily Studies; Taffanel/Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises.

Solo Repertoire: J.S. Bach Sonatas in E and B minor; Boehm Air Varie de La Molinara; Bozza Image for solo flute; Copland Duo; Feld Introduction, Toccata, and Fugue for solo flute; Hoover Winter Spirits for solo flute; Ibert Concerto; Kuhlau Six Divertissements; Martinu Sonata;  Prokofieff Sonata; Reichert Fantaisie Melancolique; Schubert Introduction, Theme and Variations; Taktakishvilli Sonata; Varèse Density 21.5  for solo flute.

Duets, Trios, Quartets, Flute Choir: Heiss Trio; Hoover Duets and Trio; Hughes Duets; Kuhlau Duets; Rossini Wind Quartets; advanced flute quartets, flute choir.

Orchestral Excerpts:Major orchestral flute solos (Bach, Bartok, Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Dvorak, Hindemith, Mendelssohn, Prokofieff, Ravel, Rossini, Saint-Saëns, Strauss, etc.)

· Major in Saxophone

Requirements for Entrance:  Prospective students should perform at least two compositions in addition to technical exercises, scales, and sight-reading.  Admission is contingent upon the audition which is held for each incoming freshman.

First Year:  Development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Klose, Voxman, Ferling, Teal.  Repertory examples: Teal, Solos for the Alto Saxophone; Bach and Handel transcriptions, Lantier, Sicilienne; Bozza, Aria.

Second Year:  Continual development of sound, tecnhique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Ferling, Rascher, Teal.  Repertory examples: Mauk, Medici Masterworks for Alto Saxophone; Platti, Sonata No. 5; Eccles, Sonata; Hindemith, Sonata.

Third Year:  Continual development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Mule, 53 Etudes after Boehm, Terchak, Furstenau Vol. 1, Dufresne, Karg-Elert, Bozza.  Repertory examples: Creston, Sonata; Heiden, Sonata; Glazunov, Concerto.

Fourth Year:  Continual development of sound, technique, and musical interpretation.  Technique - scales, arpeggios, long tone studies, Mule, 53 Etudes after Boehm, Terchak, Furstenau Vol. 2.  Repertory examples: Bozza, Improvisation and Caprice; Bonneau, Caprice en Forme de Valse.

 

 

PERFORMANCE CONCERNS

 

MUSIC ENSEMBLES

Music majors are required to participate in one of the following musical organizations each semester they are enrolled full-time in the program: Chorale.  However, it is valuable experience for students to participate in more than one organization.  Students may register for an ensemble for either 0 or 1 credit. 

Participation in music ensembles provides not only the development of musical skills, but training in working together as an ensemble as well.  With the exception of extreme cases, which are usually health related, attendance at all rehearsals and performances of the ensemble for which the students is registered is required.

· MUS 161, 162  Chorale

The Chorale is composed of approximately 75 men and women, selected by audition at the beginning of each semester.  The repertoire includes major works and selected choral literature from major historical periods and styles.  Activities include Christmas and Spring concerts, chapel performances, campus and community appearances.

· MUS 161, 162  Percussion Ensemble

Study and participation of the instruments in the band together with practical work in scoring.

 

TOURING OPPORTUNITIES

Students have various opportunities, regionally, nationally and internationally, for concert tours and performances during their college experience. 

The Nyack College Chorale alternates regional and international tours during spring breaks. Most recently, the Chorale toured Puerto Rico during the spring break of 2005.  The Chorale has presented many concerts in the New York metropolitan area.

CONCERT ATTENDANCE

 

All Music Majors in all degree programs are required to attend a minimum of three campus recitals every semester.  These programs are intended to enrich the academic program and may include student and faculty recitals, performances featuring Nyack College ensembles, and concerts sponsored by the Nyack College Art Series at Rockland. This does not include recitals that you are a participant.  Additionally, our location in the New York Metropolitan area enables students to attend outstanding performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, cathedrals and churches, including the New York Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, resident ballet companies, and solo and chamber music programs.  Off-campus concert attendance will be assigned in addition to the on-campus attendance required.

Students in all music degree programs (B.A., B.M., B.M.E., B.S.M.) are required to keep track of the concerts they attend each semester.  The Music Office will supply students with a Concert Attendance Form to be filled out and turned in at the end of each semester.

 

STUDENT RECITALS

Recitals are an exciting opportunity for students to demonstrate the talents and abilities God has given them as well as an opportunity for development and growth as a performer.  This valuable experience will give the student the opportunity to learn about stage presence, handling stage pressures, communicating effectively with the audience and becoming more relaxed with the physicality of performing.

 

Students majoring in music (except for the BA in Music majors) are required to perform in at least one Student Recital each semester in their major applied area.

 

The School of Music and the private instructors will serve the student in a supportive capacity.  Attention to the details below will assure smooth and orderly preparation, and should go a long way in making the recital experience effective and enjoyable.

 

RECITAL PREPARATION

· Teachers sign up their students for recitals on the form provided by the Music Office.

· For students using accompanists, teachers are required to hear them perform with their accompanist before the recital.

· Once the program is submitted, only teachers may make changes or cancellations.

· Vocalists, pianists and guitarists are required to memorize recital music.  Other performers should consult with their teacher regarding memorization.

· Teachers will coach students concerning stage etiquette. (Please see following page.)

 

STAGE ETIQUETTE/ PERFORMANCE SUGGESTIONS

· The soloist, regardless of gender, always precedes the accompanist when entering the stage.  When exiting the stage, the accompanist always follows the soloist.

· The soloist’s entrance is made with a moderately quick, but graceful walk to a definite spot.

· When a soloist reaches their spot, if greeted by applause, he acknowledges the courtesy with a graceful bow.  The soloist then positions himself with the proper stance for his performance.

· When the audience is quiet and ready to listen, a slight nod is given to the accompanist as a signal to begin.

· During any introductions or interludes, the soloist maintains an attentive attitude at all times.

· The mood of the song is reflected in the general manner of the soloist’s performance.  The performer should try to “look like the music.”

· When singing, the soloist should try not to stare at any one person or spot as well as not glance about in a nervous, restless manner.

· At the end of a selection or performance, the soloist should not bow until applause begins.

· An encore is not sung or played unless the audience applause calls for one.

Encore selections will be pre-approved by the faculty.

· The performer should be in control, poised, with an air of dignity and sincerity.  If the performer appears ill at ease or nervous, the audience will certainly feel uncomfortable.  The best way to learn good stage deportment is to watch the stage presence of seasoned professional performers.  Modest assurance is the ideal manner, and nothing will give a performer that assurance like intelligent practice and skill.

· All recital attire is to be modest and appropriate to the occasion, as well as subject to the approval of the private instructor.  One change of attire will be permitted during a recital.

 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR RECITALS

Performance majors must present a Junior Recital in their third year to be comprised of one-half hour of music and a Senior Recital in the fourth year to be comprised of one hour of music.  Students enrolled in the Music Education and Church Music programs are required to present a Senior Recital one-half hour in length prior to graduation.  Composition Majors will present a Senior Recital (one hour in length) of original compositions organized, conducted or performed by the student.

The following are important steps in preparing for Junior and Senior Recitals: 

1.             Recital Date (Set date at the very beginning of the semester the recital is given)

In consultation with the private instructor, a date will need to be determined which will afford the best possible audience.  This date should be set at the very beginning of the semester the recital is taking place to take advantage of the available openings on the college calendar.  It is the responsibility of the student to secure a recital date through the Music Office.               

 

2.            Reserve 6th Floor Theatre (Auditorium as soon as recital date is set.)

Olson Auditorium, or any other public hall to be used for the recital, must be reserved through the Music Office.  As there are many other activities in Olson Auditorium, it is suggested that the hall be reserved as far in advance as possible for the proposed recital.  Aside from reserving the hall for the recital alone, it is highly recommended that the student reserve the hall for one dress rehearsal with the private instructor as well.

 

3.         Accompanists (Arrange for accompanist 3 months before recital.)

Instrumentalists and vocalists requiring accompanists for their recital are personally responsible for making these arrangements. Arrangements for accompanists should be made at least three (3) months in advance of the recital.  Use of non-college persons as accompanists, assisting artists, etc., must be approved by the School of Music.  The School of Music will assist in arranging for an accompanist when necessary. (Please ask the Music Administrative Assistant for an appropriate donation or fee for the use of an accompanist.)

 

* It is essential to work out a rehearsal schedule with the accompanist and private instructor at least two (2) months prior to the recital.  Since the accompanist will be giving both time and professional expertise, it is important to acknowledge this in some manner.  The student should ask the accompanist what their fee is for rehearsals and the recital.

 

4.      House and Technical Assistants (Make arrangements one month before the recital.)

Students are responsible for choosing their stage manager, and organizing ushers, stage help and other personnel needed for the recital.

 

The Music Office must be consulted concerning who has been approved to run the sound, recording and lighting equipment. Only students who have been approved may run the equipment, and it is customary that they will charge a fee for their services.

If a video or audio recording of the recital jury and/or performance is desired, it is the student’s responsibility to make these arrangements.  This feedback will be invaluable for reviewing the performance.  Audiotapes, videotapes and CD recordings may also be included in a professional portfolio.

 

5.          Receptions (Reserve room and make arrangements one month before the recital.)

Students who choose to have a reception on the 6th Floor Theatre following their recital should reserve a room with the Music Office. Students are responsible for coordinating the reception, and assuming the cost of the food and paper-ware. The room must be returned to its proper classroom configuration following the reception.  Garbage must be secured in heavy-duty garbage bags and brought to the dumpster behind the Music Education Building.

6.          Recital Jury  (To take place four weeks before the recital.)

Four weeks prior to the recital date, recitalists will perform a recital jury before the music faculty.  The jury date is to be arranged six weeks before the recital through the Music Office.  (The form on page 53 will help facilitate this process.)  The purpose of the recital jury is to ensure that the repertoire is fully prepared and meets the curricular standard.  If the student is unprepared for the recital jury, the recital may be postponed to a later date at the discretion of the faculty.

 

Vocalists, keyboardists and guitarists must be prepared to perform the complete recital jury and recital from memory.

 

The recital jury is not a dress rehearsal.  The playing time in the juries will be limited to 20 minutes for junior recitals, and 30 minutes for senior recitals.    Students are required to provide the jury with a completed jury form and the first draft of their recital program, which have been reviewed by their private instructor.  The student must be prepared to perform all pieces on the program, as the faculty will select the pieces to be performed during the recital jury.

 

No additions to the program will be permitted subsequent to the approved recital jury without the permission of the music faculty. 

 

7.          Programs (First draft presented to faculty at jury; print program one week before the recital.)

Students are encouraged to create their own recital programs.  The Music Office can assist the student with the proper formatting of a recital program.  (An example of a well-presented recital program can be found in the appendix of this handbook.)  The Music Office can provide the student with the use of the copier and stock paper.   The School of Music must approve all programs and materials before they can be duplicated and distributed.

 

8.          Publicity (All publicity projects completed two weeks before the recital.)

Good attendance at the recital is a direct result of good publicity (e.g., posters, announcements in the Broadcaster, personal invitations, etc.).  This publicity is the responsibility of the student, although the School of Music may be able to assist in some areas.  The copy machine and stock paper are available for use for publicity projects.

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR SCHEDULING a JR/SR RECITAL JURY

& RECITAL PREPARATION CHECKLIST

 

This form has been developed to facilitate the process of scheduling the required jury for a Junior or Senior recital, and for assisting the student in making recital arrangements.

Recitalist:  _____________________________

Accompanist___________________________

Private Teacher: ________________________

 

If you are a Junior or Senior and must complete a recital you will be given a recital date several months beforehand.

 

The Music Office will find one other music faculty to attend the jury, and will notify you of who that faculty is by returning this form to you.

 

 

 

     The Music Office has scheduled this faculty member to be present at the jury:

 

      _________________________________________

If a change is made to the day/time you scheduled your jury, the process stated on this form will need to be repeated.

The below list must be reviewed by your private lesson teacher ahead of time, and presented to the faculty at your scheduled jury:

 

 

 

Recital Preparation Checklist

 

 

 

Recommended Timeframe:

Task:

 

Completed:

Beginning of semester

Set recital date/Reserve auditorium

 

 

3 months before recital

Arrange for an accompanist

 

 

6 weeks before recital

Set jury date (use form above)

 

 

1 month before recital

Arrange for house and tech assistants

 

 

 

Plan reception and reserve room

 

 

4 weeks before recital

Perform recital jury

 

 

 

Present first draft of recital program

 

 

2 weeks before recital

All publicity projects completed

 

 

1 week before recital

Print recital program

 

 

 

 

·The first draft of your recital program.

SCHOLARSHIPS, AWARDS AND GRANTS

Scholarship awarding is highly competitive at Nyack College and awarding of these monies is administered using various criteria.  In addition to the grants listed in the Nyack College Catalog, the following scholarships are awarded specifically to outstanding music majors who demonstrate discipline, achievement and high academic standing:

 

· Music Achievement Grants - awarded to freshman music majors on the basis of their entrance audition, renewable for up to 4 years provided a minimum GPA of 2.5 is maintained.

 

MUSIC EDUCATORS NATIONAL CONFERENCE

(The National Association for Music Education)

Nyack College maintains an active student chapter of Music Educators National Conference (MENC), a national organization devoted to the field of Music Education.  Music Education majors are encouraged to join MENC during their freshman year.  Membership includes a valuable subscription to the Music Educators Journal, a monthly periodical.  Nyack’s MENC chapter also sponsors field trips, professional workshops, fund raising activities, concerts and guest lecturers on campus.

 

COPYRIGHT LAWS

The School of Music is totally committed to compliance with United States copyright laws as they concern printed and recorded music.  Faculty, staff and students are expected to understand copyright laws and refrain from illegal photocopying or recording.  Older printed music not having a copyright notice is often in the Public domain and may be freely copied.  Most music of the 20th century is copyrighted and cannot be photocopied or arranged without permission from the publisher.  Contact the Music Office for more information.

 

 

 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

Music Campus Mail

The School of Music campus mailboxes are located on the 6th floor and are used to send messages, return papers, etc.  Students should check their box twice every day, since VERY IMPORTANT messages may be found in them.  Music majors also maintain their regular mailboxes on the ground floor.

Instruments

Music majors are expected to provide their own instruments in their major performing area.  Students who are taking private music lessons outside their major area and require the use of one of the college’s instruments should see the School of Music Administrative Assistant in the Music Office to make arrangements for use of an instrument. 

Employment Opportunities

Employment and ministry positions in music are posted as they are received on the bulletin board. Be sure to check the board regularly for updated opportunities.

 

Local Concerts

Local concerts that would be enriching to music majors are posted on the bulletin board.

 

Care of Personal Property

The college is not responsible for damage or loss of personal property stored or used in college-owned buildings or on college-owned property.  Students are advised to maintain adequate insurance coverage for instruments, computers, stereos, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLACES OF INTEREST

 

 

NEW YORK CITY MUSEUMS

Metropolitan Museum of Art - 82nd Street & 5th Avenue 212.535.7710  ($7.00 admission with student ID)

Museum of Modern Art – 53rd Street between 5th & 6th Avenue 212.708.9400 (Friday 4:00-7:45pm pay what you wish -other times $12.00 with student ID)

Guggenheim Museum - 89th Street & 5th Avenue 212.423.3500 (Friday 6-8:00pm pay what you wish—other times $10.00 with student ID)

Whitney Museum of American Art - Madison Avenue & 75th Street 212. 570.3600 Friday 6-9:00pm pay what you wish (other times $9.50 with student ID)

The Cloisters Museum - Medieval European Art 212. 923.3700 Fort Tyrone Park - 1 mile north of George Wash. Bridge off Henry Hudson Pkwy. ($7.00 with student ID)

 

NEW YORK CITY CONCERT HALLS

Carnegie Hall - 57th Street & 7th Avenue           212.247.7800

Lincoln Center - 65th Street & Broadway

Avery Fisher Hall     212. 875.5030

Metropolitan Opera    212.362.6000

New York City Opera and Ballet           212.870.5500

Alice Tully Hall           212.875.5050

Symphony Space - Broadway & 95th Street      212. 864.5400

92nd Street “Y” - Lexington Avenue & 92nd Street         212.996.1100

Merkin Hall - Broadway & 67th Street  212.501.3330

 

NEW YORK CITY - PLACES OF INTEREST

 

Empire State Building - 34th Street & 5th Avenue 

212. 736.3100 ($14.00 elevator to top)

St. Patrick’s Cathedral - 51st Street & 5th Avenue

212. 753.2261

Cathedral of St. John the Divine - 112th Street & Amsterdam Avenue  212.662.2133

Rockefeller Center - 50th Street & 5th Avenue  212. 332.7654

 

 

 

 

Nyack College School of Music Websites

 

School of Music  Nyack.edu/music/nyc

School of Music Academic website ncmcmusic.com

Please refer to www.songsofpeace.com for MUS213, MUS214, MUS319, MUS320, FNA115, FNA111,  FNA231 as outlined below:

www.songsofpeace.com/ncmcmusic/MUS213/mus213.html

www.songsofpeace.com/ncmcmusic/MUS214/mus214.html

www.songsofpeace.com/ncmcmusic/FNA/FNA231/music.html

 

 

Sheet Music

Patelson’s Music House: www.patelsons.com

160 West 56th Street 212.757.5587

 

Julliard  School Bookstore: www.bookstore.julliard.edu

60 Lincoln Center Plaza 212.799.5000

 

Colony Record & Radio Ctr, Inc

1619 Broadway 212.265.2050

 

Carl Fischer Inc.: www.moravianmusic.org/publishers.htm

65 Bleeker Street Fl8 212.777.0900

 

T.I.S. Music Catalog: www.tismusic.com

J.W. Pepper: jwpepper.com

Barnes & Noble: www.b&n.com

HMV Records: www.hmv.com

J&R Music  www.jr.com

CD World www.cdworld.com

Citidex (guide to all the music stores in NYC) www.citidex.com

 

LIBRARY RECOURCES:
Nyack College:

www.nyack.edu/2005.php?page=libraryHomepage

 

NYC Public Library: www.nypl.org

212.870.1630

 

HERE ARE SOME OF THE BEST UNIVERSITY WEBSITES THAT ALLOW ACCESS.

 

DUKE UNI: //library.duke.edu/about/libraries

Harvard  U. //hcl.harvard.edu/loebmusic/online-ir-intro.html

U. of California: //vos.ucsb.edu/browse.asp?id=2722

U. of Washington: //www.lib.washington.edu/music/index.html

 

WWW Sites of Interest for Music History and Musicologists:

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/music/ams/musicology_www.html

 

 

PERFORMANCE VENUES

 

92nd Street Y: www.92y.org

The Brooklyn  Academy of Music: www.bam.org

Brooklyn Center: www.brooklyncenter.com

City Center: www.citycenter.org

Dixon Place: www.dixonplace.org

The Irish Arts Center: www.irishartscenter.org

The Japan Society: www.japansociety.org

La Mama: www.lamama.org

Lincoln Center: www.lincolncenter.org

Miller Theater: www.millertheater.org

NY State Theater: www.nycballet.com

Metropolitan Opera: www.metoperafamily.org

Radio City Music Hall: www.radiocity.com

Symphony Space: www.symphonyspace.org

Town  Hall: www.the-townhall-nyc.or

Manhattan School of Music: www.msmnyc.edu

 

Sites for the Study of Music

The Aria Database: www.aria-database.com

Choralnet: www.choralnet.org

American Choral Directors Association: www.acdaonline.org

Music Educatiors Conference: www.menc.org

MUSICA: www.musicanet.org

ClassicalNet: www.classical.net

 

The Classical Music Pages:

http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/

 

A Concise History of Western Music:

 www.wwnorton.com/concise

 

Beethoven.com (a web based classical radio station)

 

Free Sheet Music

 

www.geocities.com/Area51/Realm/5747/thelinks.html

www.freesheetmusic.net/downloads.html

www.MusicOfYesterday.com

 

 

 

Gary Ewer’s Easy Music Theory (How to study music theory. This is also a resource for Basic Music  MUS111 at NCMC)

www.musictheory.halifax.ns.ca/

 

The Messiah Score (the entire score and it can be printed in PDF)

www.ccel.org/h/handel/messiah/htm/TOC.htm

 

Public Domain Music : www.pdinfo.com/list.htm

Christian Classics Ethereal Library: www.ccel.org

 

The Internet Public Library: www.ipl.org

Essentials of Music: www.essentialsofmusic.com

Naxos:  www.naxosusa.com

NY Radio Stations: www.nyradioguide.com/listings.htm

 

OVATION The Arts Network: http://www.ovationtv.com

 

Song Literature Scores:  http://www.dib.indiana.edu/variations/scores/song.html

 

Thirteen- WNET— Arts, Drama & Culture Channel 13, PBS in NYC. :  http://www.thirteen.org/homepage/subject_arts.php#music

World History:  http://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/History_n2/a.html

 

Dr. Estrella’s Incredibly Abridged Dictionary of Composers:  http://www.stevenestrella.com/composers/index.html?styletimeline.html

 

 

Standard MIDI Files: http://aitech.ac.jp/~ckelly/SMF.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please refer to www.nyack.edu for all faculty bio’s.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, June 22, 2005  ¡  1:00 p.m.   ¡  Nyack Theatre 6th Floor


 

 

 

 

 

Name,  soprano                                Title of piece                                                      Composer (b.- d.)

                                                               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                               

 

 

 

 

Name, instrument                          Title                                                                       anon.                                                                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Nyack School of Music | 335 Broadway New York, NY 10013 | 212.625.0500 www.nyackcollege.edu

 

 

 

 

 

                                                               

                                                               

                                               

 

 

 

 (this format is found as a template with the administrative assistant. Please remember to check all work before making copies.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JURY

 

 

 

Repertoire:                           Degree of Difficulty:    □Easy     □Medium    □Hard

 

 

 

 

Please note technical merits or inconsistencies:

 

 

 

 

Technique:

 

 

 

 

Style:

 

 

 

 

Accuracy:

 

 

 

 

Expression:

 

 

 

 

 

Signed__________________________________

 

 

 

(This form is intended to prepare students for their jury)